Fish

Fish

Cisco, Whitefish and Inconnu              

Updated January 2007

Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis) – Qaluhaq   
Least cisco (Coregonus sardinella)
Humpback whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) - Pikuktuq 
Broad whitefish (Coregonus nasus) – Anaakliq
Round whitefish (Prosopium cylindraceum)
Inconnu (Stenodus leucichthys) - Higaq

Population Status
Distribution: The whitefish species noted above are distributed throughout the Yukon North Slope rivers and lakes, including the Mackenzie Delta, and often have migratory patterns that take them into the brackish waters that exist along the coast during the open-water season. This is particularly true of arctic cisco, which have migratory habits at different stages of their life history that take them along the entire North Slope coast between Alaska and the Mackenzie Delta.
 
Least cisco, probably the most abundant of the whitefish species along the coast, tend to decline in numbers as one heads west of the Mackenzie Delta.
 
Lake whitefish, broad whitefish, round whitefish, and inconnu are present in relatively small numbers on the North Slope, often associated with the mouths of rivers, their estuaries, and the lagoons in the narrow strip of brackish water along the coast.
In all cases non-migratory populations may exist together with migratory ones and in the case of least cisco there are even dwarf populations present in some locations.
Population size: Unknown.
Population trend:Unknown, but thought to be stable at this time.
Unique or special characteristics:
  • Arctic cisco have a fairly complicated life history involving both Alaskan and Canadian waters. Spawning is thought to take place in the Mackenzie River system (such as the Peel and Arctic Red rivers) in the fall, after which the spent fish migrate to the Delta area. After hatching in the spring, the young-of-the-year migrate along the coast of the North Slope to Alaskan waters such as the Colville River, where it is believed they spend their juvenile years. Once mature, they return to the Mackenzie to spawn and spend their remaining mature years in the Canadian waters, migrating back and forth between their spawning grounds and the brackish coastal waters of the North Slope.
  • The majority of the anadromous least cisco seem to originate from the Mackenzie River area, migrating in a westerly direction in the spring and summer, returning to the Delta in the fall. Smaller local populations of least cisco also exist in some of the rivers and lakes of the North Slope, with some entering brackish waters. At least one dwarf non-migratory population is known to inhabit Trout Lake.
Habitat Features
The habitat preferences are similar for all the whitefish species and are not well known in this region. In the spring and summer, the anadromous populations move into the nearshore warmer, less saline, brackish waters to feed since they are less tolerant of the marine environment. As their environment changes during the fall they move back to freshwater for the winter, the mature ones proceeding to their spawning grounds before going on to the overwintering areas in the lower Mackenzie or to lakes in the North Slope area where the rivers are too shallow to support them for the whole winter. The non-anadromous populations often have migratory patterns between different freshwater habitats, used for feeding, spawning, or overwintering, which are associated with the different stages of their life history.
 
Harvest
Inuvialuit: There is a subsistence harvest for Arctic cisco in the Mackenzie River systems, on the North Slope during the summer in areas such as Shingle Point where there are summer camps, and in the rivers in Alaska such as the Colville and the Sagavanirktok. Least cisco are also taken along the coast in smaller numbers and, like Arctic cisco, are often dried for later consumption. Other whitefish species are caught incidentally and in small numbers.
From 1988 to 1999 Inuvialuit harvest data was collected through the Inuvialuit Harvest Study. In the period from 1988 to 1997, the average annual harvest reported by Aklavik residents was about 1400 inconnu and about 5800 broad whitefish. Catches of other whitefish species were also recorded. Funding and support for the collection of harvest data is supplied through the IFA and other agencies.

Inuvialuit harvesting rights to cisco, whitefish and inconnu
 
preferential
commercial harvest requires DFO licence

 
Others: Regulations under Yukon Wildlife Act, NWT Wildlife Act and National Parks Act apply in their respective jurisdictions.
 

Other resident harvesting
sport fishing with licence from GNWT or YTG
commercial fishing requires licence from DFO

 
Eco-tourism
There is no tourism potential for any whitefish species at this time except possibly for inconnu, which, being predatory and rather large, are sought by anglers in some areas.
 
Threats
It has been shown that solid-fill gravel causeways can seriously change local temperature-salinity regimes along the coast, which may in turn seriously affect the migratory patterns of whitefish since they are not as tolerant of marine conditions as true marine fish. Oil or chemical spills from shipping accidents might also create barriers that they are not able to cross or circumvent, again preventing their natural migration.
 
Species at Risk Status
Yukon: none
COSEWIC: none
CITES: none
 
Research and Monitoring
Population monitoring: None in Yukon North Slope waters other than harvest studies.
Research: In the past some research has been conducted on the effect of causeways on the migratory patterns of cisco and coastal marine fish in Alaska, and on the movement of fish along the North Slope of Yukon. In 1996, a radio tagging program of inconnu was initiated and continued into 1997.
Deficiencies:The life history details of the anadromous whitefish that travel along the North Slope are not well known. Although some information on relative abundance, distribution, and movement is available, there is still more needed, as well as a need for data relating to their length, weight, sex, maturity, food habits, and population or stock structure.
 
Management
 

Occurrence in jurisdictional areas
Ivvavik National Park
spawning, overwintering, rearing
Herschel Island Territorial Park
occurrence
East of the Babbage
spawning, overwintering, rearing
Adjoining NWT
spawning, overwintering, rearing
International agreements/ management plans
Integrated Fisheries Management Plan for Coney (Stenodus leucichthys) in the Gwich’in Settlement Region, the Inuvialuit Settlement Region and the Sahtu Settlement Area, NWT 2000-2005

Applicable legislation
IFA
Fisheries Act, Fisheries General Regulations
NWT Fisheries Regulations and Yukon Fisheries Regulations
National Parks Act and Regulations
Lead enforcement agencies
Ivvavik National Park
Parks Canada
Herschel Island Territorial Park
YTG
East of the Babbage
YTG
Adjoining NWT
GNWT

 
The Fisheries Joint Management Committee makes recommendations to the Minister of Fisheries for all fisheries matters in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. The FJMC provides the means to jointly set Inuvialuit subsistence quota and allocate such quota among the communities.
 
Community-based Information
Community-based information on this species may be found in the reports of the annual community-based monitoring program conducted in Aklavik and neighbouring communities by the Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op. http://www.taiga.net/coop/community/index.html
 
In 2004, the Inuvialuit Cultural Resources Centre prepared a report titled “Tariurmiutuakun qanuq atuutiviksaitlu ilitchuriyaqput ingilraan Inuvialuit qulianginnin = Learning about marine resources and their use through Inuvialuit oral history”. Transcripts from two Inuvialuit oral history collections were reviewed to see what could be learned about marine resources and their use within the southeastern Beaufort Sea. The study area included the coast from the Yukon/United States border in the west to the Franklin Bay area in the east. Information was compiled on beluga and bowhead whales, some coastal birds, fish, polar bears and seals, in an effort to provide a foundation for developing future projects on Inuvialuit knowledge of marine resources. http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/279627.pdf
 
Related Literature and Information Sources
Bond, W. and R. Erickson. 1989. Summer studies of the nearshore fish community at Phillips Bay, Beaufort Sea coast, Yukon. Can. Tech. Rept. Fish. Aquat. Sci.
 
Joint Secretariat, 2003. Inuvialuit Harvest Study, Data and Methods Report 1988 – 1997. Inuvik, NT.   http://www.fjmc.ca/publications/IHS.htm
 
 
Stephenson, S., J. Burrows and J. Babaluk. 2005. Long-distance migrations by inconnu (Stenodus leucichthys) in the Mackenzie River system. Arctic. 58 (1): 21-25.
 


Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus)-Hulukpaugaq
Updated January 2007
 
Population Status
Distribution: Largely unknown although a few studies have noted the presence of grayling in lakes on the Yukon North Slope. Grayling have been recorded in Anker Creek, Babbage River, Big Fish River, Blow River, Deep Creek, Firth River, Fish Hole Creek, Malcolm River, No. 11200 Creek, Rapid Creek, Running River, Spring River and Trail River.
Population size: Unknown.
Population trend: Unknown. It is the opinion of native fishers on the Big Fish River that large grayling are very scarce compared to previous years.
Unique or special characteristics: Unknown.
Habitat Features
Unknown.
 
Harvest
Inuvialuit: There is no restriction on the Inuvialuit harvest of Arctic grayling on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Others: Yukon sport fishing regulations apply to others fishing on the Yukon North Slope. Parks Canada regulations apply within Ivvavik National Park.
 
The FJMC conducts a sport angler survey of recreational anglers who have purchased a licence, or registered to fish, in the ISR between April and September each year. The objective of the survey is to determine the number, species and location of fish caught by sport anglers within the ISR during the spring and summer fishing season. Anglers surveyed include those issued with a Parks Canada fishing permits to fish within Ivvavik National Park. Most sport fish catches were reported from along the Firth River corridor.
 
Eco-tourism
Arctic grayling attract little to no eco-tourism on the Yukon North Slope, as this species is found throughout the Yukon.
 
Threats
Habitat destruction
 
Species at Risk Status
Yukon: none
COSEWIC: none
CITES: none
 
Research and Monitoring
Population monitoring: None.
Research: Some research was conducted in the early 1970s as part of Mackenzie valley pipeline studies. Information collected included distribution, length/weight relationships, and food habits.Aquatic studies were carried out in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in 2002 as part of a feasibility study for the Mackenzie Delta Gas Opportunity. Studies have also been conducted in the area to the east of the Yukon North Slope in the Gwich’in Settlement Area.
Deficiencies:Most aspects of Arctic Grayling ecology on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Management
The Fisheries Joint Management Committee makes recommendations to the Minister of Fisheries for all fisheries matters in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. The FJMC provides the means to jointly set Inuvialuit subsistence quota and allocate such quota among the communities.
 
Community-based Information
Community-based information on this species may be found in the reports of the annual community-based monitoring program conducted in Aklavik and neighbouring communities by the Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op. http://www.taiga.net/coop/community/index.html
 
Related Literature and Information Sources
 
Bryan, J.E., C.E. Walker, R.E. Kendel, and M.S. Elson. 1973. Freshwater aquatic ecology in northern Yukon Territory 1971. Northern Operations Branch, Fisheries and Marine Services, Dept. of the Environment.
 
Chiperzak, D. 1999. Personal Communication, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Yellowknife.
 
Joint Secretariat, 2003. Inuvialuit Harvest Study, Data and Methods Report 1988 – 1997. Inuvik, NT.   http://www.fjmc.ca/publications/IHS.htm
 
Parks Canada. 2003. Annual Report of Research and Monitoring in National Parks of the Western Arctic 2003. http://www.pc.gc.ca/docs/v-g/rs-rm2003/sec1/index_E.asp
 
Steigenberger, L.W., G.J. Birch, P.G. Bruce, and R.A. Robertson. 1973. Northern Yukon freshwater fisheries studies 1973. Northern Operations Branch, Fisheries and Marine Services, Dept. of the Environment.
 
Stephenson, S. 1999. Personal Communication, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Inuvik.
 
 


Northern pike (Esox lucius)- Hiulik
Updated January 2007
 
Population Status
Distribution: Largely unknown although a few studies have reported the presence of Northern Pike in some lakes on the Yukon North Slope and in Deep Creek.
Population size:Unknown.
Population trend: Unknown.
Unique or special characteristics: Unknown.
Habitat Features
Unknown.
 
Harvest
From 1988 to 1999 Inuvialuit harvest data was collected through the Inuvialuit Harvest Study. Some harvest information about northern pike was collected at this time. There is no restriction on the Inuvialuit harvest of northern pike on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Yukon sport fishing regulations apply to others fishing on the Yukon North Slope. Parks Canada regulations apply within Ivvavik National Park.
 

Inuvialuit harvesting rights to
 
preferential
Other resident harvesting
Sport fishing with licence
 

 
Eco-tourism
Northern pike attract little to no eco-tourism on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Threats
Unknown.
 
Species at Risk Status
Yukon: none
COSEWIC: none
CITES: none
 
Research and Monitoring
Population monitoring: Unknown
Research: Some research conducted in the early 1970s as part of the Mackenzie Valley pipeline studies. Information collected included limited distribution data, length/weight relationships, and food habits.
Deficiencies:Most aspects of northern pike ecology on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Management
 

Occurrence in jurisdictional areas
Ivvavik National Park
 
Herschel Island Territorial Park
 
East of the Babbage
 
Adjoining NWT
 
International agreements/ management plans
none
Applicable legislation
IFA
Fisheries Act, Fisheries General Regulations
NWT Fisheries Regulations and Yukon Fisheries Regulations
National Parks Act and Regulations
Lead enforcement agencies
Ivvavik National Park
Parks Canada
Herschel Island Territorial Park
YTG
East of the Babbage
YTG
Adjoining NWT
GNWT

 
The Fisheries Joint Management Committee makes recommendations to the Minister of Fisheries for all fisheries matters in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. The FJMC provides the means to jointly set Inuvialuit subsistence quota and allocate such quota among the communities.
 
Community-based Information
Community-based information on this species may be found in the reports of the annual community-based monitoring program conducted in Aklavik and neighbouring communities by the Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op. http://www.taiga.net/coop/community/index.html
 
Related Literature and Information Sources
 
Bryan, J.E., C.E. Walker, R.E. Kendel, and M.S. Elson. 1973. Freshwater aquatic ecology in northern Yukon Territory 1971. Northern Operations Branch, Fisheries and Marine Services, Dept. of the Environment.
 
Chiperzak, D. 1999. Personal communication, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Yellowknife.
 
Joint Secretariat, 2003. Inuvialuit Harvest Study, Data and Methods Report 1988 – 1997. Inuvik, NT.   http://www.fjmc.ca/publications/IHS.htm
 
Steigenberger, L.W., G.J. Birch, P.G. Bruce, and R.A. Robertson. 1973. Northern Yukon freshwater fisheries studies 1973. Northern Operations Branch, Fisheries and Marine Services, Dept. of the Environment.
 
Stephenson, S. 1999. Personal communication, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Inuvik.


Dolly Varden charr (Salvelinus malma)- Qalukpik
Updated January 2007
 
Population Status
Distribution: Dolly Varden charr occur within four systems in the northern Yukon and northwestern Northwest Territories (Babbage, Firth, Rat and Big Fish rivers). In summer, charr from all four stocks intermingle in Yukon nearshore waters to feed.
 
Population size:Anadromous Dolly Varden charr have been enumerated at the Babbage, Big Fish, and Rat rivers. The Dept of Fisheries and Oceans completed a stock assessment of the Rat River population in 2001. The size of the Firth River stock is not known but is believed to be larger than the Babbage River stock. Since all four systems have never been enumerated in the same season, and some of the fish are thought to move among systems in different years, these estimates must be interpreted with caution.
 
Population trend: Babbage and Firth rivers: unknown, but probably stable as neither river receives significant harvest pressure. Population estimates of charr in the Rat River system in 1996 and 1998 indicated the population to be relatively stable. Concerns over the decline of charr in the Big Fish River prompted a conservation closure of the fishery – almost 20 years have passed and the fishery remains closed..
 
Unique or special characteristics:
  • Anadromous Dolly Varden charr of the Yukon North Slope are an international species, with some life history stages ranging to Alaskan coastal waters and streams (particularly from the Firth River). There are many streams in northern Alaska that are utilized by Dolly Varden charr, and these fish probably also utilize Yukon coastal waters to some extent.
 
Habitat Features
Each of the four river systems (Babbage, Firth, Big Fish, and Rat) is fed by one or more perennial springs, and this produces one or more "fish holes": areas that remain open year-round and thus provide overwintering and spawning habitat for the charr. Hence, spawning and overwintering sites are relatively well known, and recent studies have shown that the physical characteristics of the fish holes may change with time as sodium, water, and silt levels fluctuate. The effects of these changes on the fish could be dramatic and this is currently under investigation.
 
Harvest
Inuvialuit: Under the IFA, the Aklavik Hunters and Trappers Committee has the authority to develop bylaws that apply to the Inuvialuit harvest of specific species, if required. NWT laws must then reflect these bylaws; bylaws may also be reflected in Ivvavik National Park regulations and Yukon wildlife regulations. There are no bylaws in place in Aklavik for charr fishing at the present time. However, from time to time, the community has voluntary closures and limits, set by the HTC for specific cases (e.g., Big Fish River, 1992, 1993).
 
Annual subsistence harvests at the Big Fish River, Shingle Point, and Rat River are monitored by the community harvest monitors hired by FJMC and the Gwich’in Renewable Resource Board. Data is also collected by the Gwich’in Harvest Study.
 
From 1988 to 1999 Inuvialuit harvest data was collected through the Inuvialuit Harvest Study. In the period from 1988 to 1997, the average annual harvest reported by Aklavik residents was 1110.
 
There is little or no subsistence harvesting of Dolly Varden charr from the Firth River. The Rat River continues to support a significant subsistence harvest of Dolly Varden charr by the residents of Fort McPherson. Residents of Aklavik catch Rat River charr as well, when the fish are migrating past Shingle Point and past Aklavik, en route to the Rat River overwintering areas.
 
Others: Within Ivvavik National Park, a sport fishing licence issued by Parks Canada is necessary, with regulations set by Parks Canada.
The FJMC conducts a sport angler survey of recreational anglers who have purchased a licence, or registered to fish, in the ISR between April and September each year. The objective of the survey is to determine the number, species and location of fish caught by sport anglers within the ISR during the spring and summer fishing season. Anglers surveyed include those issued with a Parks Canada fishing permits to fish within Ivvavik National Park. Most sport fish catches were reported from along the Firth River corridor. There are no areas in the Western Arctic open to commercial fishing for Dolly Varden charr.
 
Eco-tourism
The charr can be relatively visible when on the overwintering/spawning grounds (e.g., "fish holes"). However, these sites are very inaccessible, and the fish are particularly sensitive to disturbance/fishing at that time. As a sport fish, it is prized by anglers due to its limited range, big size, and good flavour.
 
Threats
Habitat alterations and overharvesting are the major threats faced by these charr. Any development activity (roads, right-of-ways, etc.) that would diminish the integrity or physical characteristics (water level, oxygen level, silt loads, temperature, pH, etc.) of the spawning/overwintering area would pose a threat to developing embryos, rearing juveniles, or spawning/overwintering adults found in these areas.
 
Species at Risk Status
Yukon: none
COSEWIC: none
CITES: none
 
Research and Monitoring
Population monitoring: Ongoing monitoring of the Rat River population.
 
Research: In 2000, the Dept of Fisheries and Oceans initiated the Tariuq program in the communities of Tuktoyaktuk and Aklavik as a means for community members to discuss concerns related to the health of the ocean and to develop their own community-based monitoring program. The program included a gillnetting study in order to understand species abundance and health of fish from selected locations in the Mackenzie estuary. Species collected include broad whitefish, lake whitefish, inconnu, pike, least cisco, arctic cisco, burbot, pacific herring, Dolly Varden, and four horned sculpins.
 
The Dept of Fisheries and Oceans completed a stock assessment of the Rat River population in 2001.
 
Twenty external radio tags were applied to post-spawners at the Big Fish River in fall 1993 to determine annual movements and degree of mixing among systems. Energetic studies comparing Babbage and Big Fish River charr are complete. Developmental chronology, age of maturity, sex ratio, food habits, size range, morphology and age have been studied.
Deficiencies:Work currently underway is needed to more fully define and understand the management units (abundance, movements, productivity, behaviour) and their habitats. Little is known about residual and isolated-resident fish. Little information exists on their marine habitats.
 
Management
The Fisheries Joint Management Committee makes recommendations to the Minister of Fisheries for all fisheries matters in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. The FJMC provides the means to jointly set Inuvialuit subsistence quota and allocate such quota among the communities.
 
A Rat River Char Fishing Plan has been developed by working group that includes representatives of the Aklavik Renewable Resource Council, the Fort McPherson Renewable Resource Council, and the Aklavik Hunters and Trappers Committee. While the Rat River is not within the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, the Dolly Varden char that spawn in the river make their way to the ocean by way of the west channel of the Mackenzie River and spend time in the coastal waters of the Beaufort Sea. During those migrations they are harvested by Inuvialuit, particularly the residents of Aklavik.
 
Community-based Information
 
In 2000, the Dept of Fisheries and Oceans initiated the Tariuq program in the communities of Tuktoyaktuk and Aklavik as a means for community members to discuss concerns related to the health of the ocean and to develop their own community-based monitoring program. http://www.cos-soc.gc.ca/vignettes/tariuq_e.asp
 
In 2002 and 2003, the West Side Working group conducted a traditional ecological knowledge of fisheries in rivers west of the Mackenzie Delta. The study enabled fishers and elders to share their knowledge related to fish species, fishing methods and changes in species and fishing areas over time. http://www.fjmc.ca/
 
Community-based information on this species may also be found in the reports of the annual community-based monitoring program conducted in Aklavik and neighbouring communities by the Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op. http://www.taiga.net/coop/community/index.html
 
Related Literature and Information Sources
 
Harwood, L. Personal Communication, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Yellowknife.
 
Harwood, L. and S. Sandstrom. 1996. Stock status of Dolly Varden charr in the Big Fish River, Northwest Territories. Background document prep’d for Arctic Fisheries Scientific Advisory Committee (AFSAC). Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg.
 
Johnson, L. 1980. The Arctic charr, Salvelinus alpinus. p. 15-98. in: E. Balon (ed.), Charrs: Salmonid fishes of the genus Salvelinus. The Hague.
 
Joint Secretariat, 2003. Inuvialuit Harvest Study, Data and Methods Report 1988 – 1997. Inuvik, NT.   http://www.fjmc.ca/publications/IHS.htm
 
Gordon, Danny C. Personal communication, Elder, Aklavik, NWT.
 
Papik, R., M. Marschke and G.B. Ayles, 2003. Inuvialuit traditional ecological knowledge of fisheries in rivers west of the Mackenzie Delta in the Canadian Arctic. Canada/ Inuvialuit Fisheries Joint Management Committee report 2003 - 4.
 
Parks Canada. 2003. Annual Report of Research and Monitoring in National Parks of the Western Arctic 2003. http://www.pc.gc.ca/docs/v-g/rs-rm2003/sec1/index_E.asp
 
Reist, J. 1989. Genetic structuring of allopatric populations and sympatric life history types of charr, Salvelinus alpinus/malma, in the western Arctic. Canada. Physiol. Ecol. Japan, Spec. Vol. 1: 405-420.
 
Reist, J.D., J.D. Johnson, and T.J. Carmichael. 1997. Variation and specific identity of char from Northwestern Arctic Canada and Alaska. Amer. Fish. Soc. Symp. 19:250-261.
 
Stephenson, T. and P. Lemieux. 1990. Status of the Rat River Arctic charr population, 1989. Prep’d by Department of Fisheries and Oceans for Fisheries Joint Management Committee, Inuvik.
 


Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) - Iqaluakpak 
Updated January 2007
 
Population Status
Distribution: Largely unknown although some studies have reported Lake Trout in lakes on the Yukon North Slope.
Population size:Unknown.
Population trend: Unknown.
Unique or special characteristics: Unknown.
Habitat Features
Unknown.
 
Harvest
Little to no harvest of Lake Trout occurs on the Yukon North Slope. From 1988 to 1999 Inuvialuit harvest data for lake trout was collected through the Inuvialuit Harvest Study. There is no restriction on the Inuvialuit harvest of Lake Trout on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Yukon sport fishing regulations apply to others fishing on the Yukon North Slope. Parks Canada regulations apply within Ivvavik National Park.
 
The FJMC conducts a sport angler survey of recreational anglers who have purchased a licence, or registered to fish, in the ISR between April and September each year. The objective of the survey is to determine the number, species and location of fish caught by sport anglers within the ISR during the spring and summer fishing season. Anglers surveyed include those issued with a Parks Canada fishing permits to fish within Ivvavik National Park. Most sport fish catches were reported from along the Firth River corridor.
 

Inuvialuit harvesting rights to lake trout
 
preferential
Other resident harvesting
Sport fishing with licence
 

 
Eco-tourism
Lake trout attract little to no eco-tourism on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Threats
Unknown.
 
Species at Risk Status
Yukon: none
COSEWIC: none
CITES: none
 
Research and Monitoring
Population monitoring: No ongoing program.
Research: Some research conducted in the early 1970s as part of the Mackenzie valley pipeline studies. Information collected included limited distribution data, length/weight relationships and food habits.
Deficiencies:Most aspects of Lake Trout ecology on the Yukon North Slope.
 
Management
 

Occurrence in jurisdictional areas
Ivvavik National Park
 
Herschel Island Territorial Park
 
East of the Babbage
 
Adjoining NWT
 
International agreements/ management plans
none
Applicable legislation
IFA
Fisheries Act, Fisheries General Regulations
NWT Fisheries Regulations and Yukon Fisheries Regulations
National Parks Act and Regulations
Lead enforcement agencies
Ivvavik National Park
Parks Canada
Herschel Island Territorial Park
YTG
East of the Babbage
YTG
Adjoining NWT
GNWT

 
The Fisheries Joint Management Committee makes recommendations to the Minister of Fisheries for all fisheries matters in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region. The FJMC provides the means to jointly set Inuvialuit subsistence quota and allocate such quota among the communities.
 
Community-based Information
Community-based information on this species may be found in the reports of the annual community-based monitoring program conducted in Aklavik and neighbouring communities by the Arctic Borderlands Ecological Knowledge Co-op. http://www.taiga.net/coop/community/index.html
 
Related Literature and Information Sources
 
Bryan, J.E., C.E. Walker, R.E. Kendel, and M.S. Elson. 1973. Freshwater aquatic ecology in northern Yukon Territory 1971. Northern Operations Branch, Fisheries and Marine Services, Dept. of the Environment.
 
Chiperzak, D. 1999. Personal communication, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Yellowknife.
 
Joint Secretariat, 2003. Inuvialuit Harvest Study, Data and Methods Report 1988 – 1997. Inuvik, NT.   http://www.fjmc.ca/publications/IHS.htm
 
Parks Canada. 2003. Annual Report of Research and Monitoring in National Parks of the Western Arctic 2003. http://www.pc.gc.ca/docs/v-g/rs-rm2003/sec1/index_E.asp
 
Steigenberger, L.W., G.J. Birch, P.G. Bruce, and R.A. Robertson. 1973. Northern Yukon freshwater fisheries studies 1973. Northern Operations Branch, Fisheries and Marine Services, Dept. of the Environment.
 
Stephenson, S. 1999. Personal communication, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Inuvik.